Collage: Cutting Edges

Cutting Edges Contemporary Collage

 

"Collage is the systematic exploitation of the coincidental or artificially induced encounter of two or more unrelated realities on an apparently inappropriate plane - and the spark of poetry that leaps across the gaps between them."

"Magritte remained unparalleled in his ability to combine different objects in a way that only made sense to himself, but remained an insoluble puzzle for everyone else."

Quotation and images taken from the book

 

Details
Details
Details
Details

Below are works by Alejandro Chavetta. The colour palette is quite limited with the monochrome tone and one primary colour. The contrast in colour makes me first put my attention to the bright colour and then looking around the piece respectively. The identity of the figure is, again, hidden under animal head and I believe is a picture of a brain. The combination is quite surreal, and at the same time, I don't quite understand the meaning of each piece, but visually they all look striking with colour contrast and random elements in them.

Details
Details

Many of the contemporary collage work has developed from surrealism, which is about visually expressing the impossible. Looking through the book, I noticed that in order for the collage to look surrealistic, it needs to be unrealistic because that's what subconscious mind is about. The elements in collage sometimes make sense and sometimes don't, but the combination is usually unrelated and even if they're related, they're arranged in a unique way.

I like Mira Ruido's work here on the left because it's not only simple but also tells a story as well. He combines artificial and nature things together and have the viewer trying to make sense out of it. On the right side, the work by PNTS has similar images combined in one piece, but the way they're arranged in like a pattern. The same image is cut into shapes and put together as a new sequence. What's interesting about this style of work is that each piece looks very confusing from far away, but as I look closer, it reveals much details and the amount of work put into one piece. This is one of the crucial point I think I should put into my collage in order to grab the audience's attention, to have them actually observe my work from up-close and from faraway. 

Details
Details

These various shapes of texture work are done by Malin Gabriella Nordin. The style of work is quite simplistic, but all the texture shapes invite me to look at each one of them carefully and wonder what sort of original object they're supposed to represent. This reminded me that I could also cut interesting texture from found images or images that I took and reuse them as a new object. For example, I could have water texture cut into a shape of a skirt.

 

Details
Details
Details
Details

Below is the work by Jesse Draxler. The artist uses one image as the center of interest without distorting any part of the figure. However, I think the technique he uses to add the direction of the action is creative. The echoing lines of found images make the action in the piece complete. For my work, I can put some of these lines on any object to add motion and make the piece more alive.

Details
Details

Comments


    Add comment

    Fields marked by '*' are required.
    Comments are moderated. If you choose to make this comment public, it will not be visible to others until it is approved by the owner.